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Adi Kappyare Kootamani - Movie Review : Enter At Your Own Risk
Unlikely to have any lasting impact on the audience save for a few well crafted comic sequences. If at all it is going to strike a chord with anyone, it is going to be with a few youngsters who are not on the lookout for a quality fare | Anoop S
On Dec 27, 2015

Debutant director John Vargheese’s ‘Adi Kappyare Kootmani’ is an effort to make a movie out of an outlandish, wafer-thin premise. If it still keeps the viewers from being far too restless in their seats, the movie owes it to a few scenes that are interspersed in the narrative that are a complete riot.

‘Adi Kappyare Kootamani’ focuses its attention on the gang of Bhanuprasad (Dhyan Sreenivasan), Remo (Neeraj Madhav), Bruno (Ajju Vargheese) and Chacko (Vineeth Mohan) in a college men’s hostel. It is one of those hostels where anything can happen despite the inmates being under the watchful eyes of Warden Fr. Alfred (Mukesh).

Adiksha Lakshmi (Namitha Pramod) strikes a deal with Bhanuprasad (Dhyan Sreenivasan) to make a short, secret but purposeful visit to the hostel. He ends up hiding Adiksha in his room after his initial plan to make a safe exit for her from the hostel fails. It is anybody’s guess that the storyline would be manipulated in such a way that the lead characters would have to face one setback after other in their pursuit to get her out of the hostel and the setbacks wouldn’t be a body blow so that the narrative can be taken forward.

‘Adi Kappyare Kootamani’ is definitely going to be an utter disappointment for those who are not able to leave their logic at the back of their minds early on in the piece itself. It doesn’t have an iota of realism and is an extremely manipulative tale. Although it occasionally veers off into crass comedy and there are one too many sex jokes, ‘Adi Kappyare Kootamani’ relies heavily on slapstick comedy which is thankfully of a non-toxic nature.

John Vargheese shows flashes of promise here and there but it would be prudent on his part to do some homework before attempting a fresh venture. He has managed to bring out the nuances of hostel life remarkably well and some of the sequences are extremely hilarious to say the least. His attempt to surprise the viewer with a twist of sorts doesn’t have neither much of an impact on the narrative or the shock value he would have expected on the viewer.

Although they do have their share of moments in the movie and have done their roles fairly well, there is nothing much to write about the performances of Dhyan Sreenivsan, Ajju Vargheese and Neeraj Madhav as they have been able to leave more penetrable impressions on the viewer in some other movies of theirs. Vineeth Mohan who is a relatively new face manages to bring in freshness as the fourth member of the gang. Namitha Pramod doesn’t have anything much to offer but Mukesh scores a few brownie points as the warden priest.

 

‘Adi Kappyare Kootamani’ has been almost exclusively shot in the hostel. Cinematographer Ajay David Kachapally deserves a wee bit of credit for not tiring us out with his visuals of the very same settings. Shaan Rahman’s background score tends to be a bit loud at times and his compositions are not memorable either.

In the final assessment, ‘Adi Kappyare Kootamani’ is a movie that is unlikely to have any lasting impact on the audience save for a few well crafted comic sequences. If at all it is going to strike a chord with anyone, it is going to be with a few youngsters who are not on the lookout for a quality fare. Enter at your own risk!

 
 
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